The Quick and the Dead FAE, Part 2

First off, huge thanks to Quinn Murphy for giving me the next round of changes to my FAE hack for the Quick and the Dead. His input directly led to what you see here. It should play pretty quickly, assuming a small number of players and rounds. Let me know what you think, especially if you’re a brave soul that likes to alpha-test stuff.

The Quick and the Dead FAE (v2)

 

Quick and Dirty: The Quick and the Dead FAE

Quinn Murphy’s been doing a take on Sleepy Hollow FAE, and it inspired me to do this. It’s quick, it’s dirty, and it’s not something I’ve put a lot of thought into.

One of the movies that I really like that I don’t think gets much respect is the Quick and the Dead. It’s a fun movie that I’ve watched several times now. After playtesting The Dark Road at Metatopia, I wanted to watch it again.

I thought it might be fun to stat up the main characters using FAE. I decided not to alter the approaches, but I did add a drive/motivation. Each of the characters in the movie has a drive, and I wanted to highlight that. Let me know what you think.

FAE The Quick and the Dead

Metatopia 2014 Recap

I have so many thoughts about Metatopia. I went last year as a player and this year as a designer. I was a bit anxious, but this year convinced me that Metatopia is a second home for me. I feel comfortable enough there to help others get over their nervousness (or least I hope I was able to do so).

Friday was mostly panels and my playtests. Saturday was playtesting other people’s games. Sunday was winding down and saying goodbye to all of the wonderful examples of humanity I met and met again.

Friday

Thanks to Shane Harsch, Clark Valentine, and Tim Rodriguez for a panel about how we represent hacking in games. It was informative and fun. Spoiler: Real hacking is boring, methodical, and takes more time than we usually represent. There’s ways to make it interesting, though.

Thanks to Mark Diaz Truman, Marissa Kelly, Jason Pitre, and Brie Sheldon for the Meet the IGDN panel. I recently joined, and I wanted to get more information. I’m looking forward to interacting even more with them and talking design and publishing stuff.

The next was the first panel I’ve ever sat on. It was an editing panel with John Adamus and Amanda Valentine, and I hope I was a good panelmate. It was a lot of fun, and we talked about all kinds of things. There was even a rant or two.

Next up I had my playtests for Memories of Metal and Bone. Imagine if the battle for Midgaard between the Dwarves and the Vikings continued into space. Raganarok didn’t happen, and you’re playing the crew of the living ship Stormbeard on the run and trying to find out why.

My first group of playtesters were terrific. Thanks to Maksim Mukhammedov, Shervyn Von Hoerl, Rich Flynn, Joshua Kronengold, Brennan Taylor, and Michael Capron. Highlights include overloading its engines while also constricting it and snapping it in half. Also a dwarf hostage.

The second group of playtesters were also terrific. Thanks to Neal Tanner, Paul Stefko, Jamie Stefko, Joshua Yearsley, Jim Cummings, and Jim Crocker. Highlights from this game are overloading the internal systems of the Dwarven Destroyer and ramming Stormbeard into it while also throwing flaming diamonds at its hull.

Saturday

Saturday was NoirWorld, designed and run by my dear, dear friend John Adamus. Have I told you about NoirWorld? It’s amazing, and I’m no noir fanatic. I played the Fatale planning to have a starlet kidnapped to make room for me and a drunken, homeless former playboy. It ended with a three-way shoot-out, but I can’t remember if my PC died or was just seriously wounded.

Next up was Ars Magicka GUMSHOE with Cam Banks. This one was a ton of fun, and I can’t wait to see what develops. I played a member of a magical house without actual magic of their own and had a blast. This was also my first opportunity to meet Josh Drobina, who I got to play with in another game.

Headspace, an Apocalypse World hack for cyberpunk (actual cyberpunk, fighting against evil corporations), was next on my list. This one was another one I’d been hearing about for a while, as I know its designer Mark Richardson pretty well. It was over-the-top action, and great fun was had by great fun was had by Kira Magrann, Justin Jacobson, Will Hindmarch, and Ken Hite.

The Dark Road, Mark Diaz Truman’s western gunslinger using rules from Project Dark, was amazing, if short. I wanted to play this ever since I got to see a glimpse of the mechanics on G+ a while back. I got to play a Priest that went toe-to-toe with the head of the town, leading him to give up the gunslinger he’d been protecting. The other two players were just as amazing, although I can’t remember their names.

Last on my list for the day was a Timewatch game, this one courtesy of Kevin Kulp, but using Dave Chalker’s parallel realities (think Sliders) rules. Best scene was my character betraying the other PCs and deciding to work with my evil duplicate in the parallel reality. So much fun! Thanks for playing with me, Elsa, Ruth, Josh, and others!

 

In Closing

Metatopia is home for me now. I can say that with certainty. Despite the anxiety of playtesting my first design publicly, it was comfortable there. Everyone I met was amazing, and if I missed meeting you there, I’m sorry. Next year!

There are far too many of you to thank, but I need to thank a few in a special way.

Thanks to Matt Will Jackson: we’ll always have Headless Action Figure. Thanks to John Adamus for opening his home to me (again) and being one of the best friends I could ask for. Thanks to John Stravropolous for calling me a cool guy. Thanks to Ericka Skirpan, Cheyenne Rae Grimes, Lindsay McCollough, and Mark Richardson for being there and hanging out throughout the weekend. Thanks to Vinny Salzillo and Avonelle Wing for putting on the best convention I can imagine. Thanks to Stephen Hood for being willing to play my game even though we couldn’t make the schedule work out. Thanks to Sarah Richardson, just because she’s tons of fun to game with, and it was great to meet in person.

Argh! There’s so many awesome people to thank that I don’t think I can name them all!

My Metatopia 2014 Schedule

I’m putting this here on the blog so I can refer back to it later. Last year, I went as a playtester (even though I used the convention to get my name out there as an editor, with several projects resulting from it). This year I’m going as an industry professional (remember: this just means I’ve been paid to do a thing and that I paid a higher price to be able to schedule playtests of my design work).

I’ve got one panel I’m sitting on (What Can an Editor Do For You?) and two playtests of my LB / A/N/N hack inspired by Iron Edda. Oh, I’m also now a member of the IGDN (Surprise!), so I’ve definitely got to be there for the meet and greet.

Okay, enough preamble.

[D002] “Computer Hacking In Games”

Presented by Shane Harsch

An actual professional in information security discusses the actual process/stages of intrusion (what we call the “Kill Chain”) and then facilitates a discussion about the challenges of turning that real-world process into an actionable and fun gaming experience.

Friday 9:00AM-10:00AM
One Session
All Ages

[D008] “Meet The IGDN!”

Presented by Marissa Kelly, Jason Pitre, Brie Sheldon, and Mark Diaz Truman

Over the past three years, the Indie Game Developer Network has grown from a small group of hopeful publishers to a trade organization with nearly fifty dues-paying members. Come learn more about this organization, how we’re organized, what our goals are for 2015, and what the future holds for the IGDN!

Friday 11:00AM-12:00PM
One Session
All Ages

[D010] “Dungeons & Dragons Fifth Edition Analysis”

Presented by Rob Donoghue & Jason Pitre

So, the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons is out. Now it’s time to dig into the design and talk about the rules, procedures and advice that the game brings to the RPG design field. Let’s look at the crunchy bits!

Friday, 12:00PM – 1:00PM
Serious, All Ages

[D021] “What Can An Editor Do For You?”

Presented by John Adamus, Jeremy Morgan, and Amanda Valentine.

Cleaning up your tortured syntax and fixing your punctuation is only the beginning. A good editor can help you improve the presentation of your game on many levels.

Friday 3:00PM-4:00PM
One Session
All Ages

[R176] Iron Edda; “Memories of Metal and Bone”

By Stormin’ Da Castle
Presented by Jeremy Morgan

Memories of Metal and Bone is based on Iron Edda, using mechanics from Lady Blackbird and Always/Never/Now. Midgaard lies in ruin, and we’ve gone into space aboard our Jotunn living ships, but the damned Dwarves also found a way to develop spacecraft, and they’re up here too. We’re the crew of the Stormbeard, and we search for why Ragnarok didn’t happen.

Friday, 4:00PM – 6:00PM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

[R228] Iron Edda; “Memories of Metal and Bone”

By Stormin’ Da Castle
Presented by Jeremy Morgan

Memories of Metal and Bone is based on Iron Edda, using mechanics from Lady Blackbird and Always/Never/Now. Midgaard lies in ruin, and we’ve gone into space aboard our Jotunn living ships, but the damned Dwarves also found a way to develop spacecraft, and they’re up here too. We’re the crew of the Stormbeard, and we search for why Ragnarok didn’t happen.

Friday, 4:00PM – 6:00PM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

[D035] “Designing For Disability Access”

Presented by Elsa S. Henry

Elsa is a multiply disabled game designer and player. Her game reviews – Blind Lady Versus – have enabled her to begin spotting general issues which game designers can avoid. Games can be accessible for everyone, from tabletop to LARP, from blindness to mobility issues. Games are for everyone.

Saturday 9:00AM-10:00AM
One Session
All Ages

[R303] “Noir World”

By The Writer Next Door
Presented by John Adamus

Noir World is a collaborative-GM Apocalypse Word hack focusing on a noir world of both classic and neo film tropes. Players take on the roles of detectives, femme fatales, mooks, war vets and more in tragic tales of crime, suffering and corruption as they not only direct play but shape the story they’re telling. This game’s influences run a gamut from The Maltese Falcon. Double Indemnity and Out of the Past to neo-noirs like Pulp Fiction, Sin City and Brick.

Saturday, 11:00AM – 1:00PM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

[R335] “Ars Magica GUMSHOE RPG”

By Atlas Games
Presented by Cam Banks

The Quaesitors of House Guernicus are the executors of Mythic Europe’s magical traditions, seeking out the rot that festers in the heart of the Order of Hermes. Using hermetic magic and the assistance of their trusty companions & grogs, Quaesitors must solve mysteries impossible to solve with 13th century methods. Join designer Cam Banks in testing this marriage of gaming’s premier investigative rules with the award-winning world of Ars Magica.

Saturday, 2:00PM – 4:00PM
Fun, 18 & Over ONLY

[R360] “Headspace”

By Green Hat Designs
Presented by Mark Richardson

Headspace is a cyberpunk game where the players are operatives fighting against evil corporations. You’ll need to make use not only of your own hyper-competence but that of your teammates by use of shared mental and emotional consciousness, the Headspace. There’s a catch though: Everyone’s got baggage and digging too deeply into the Space can quickly turn a simple Op into a battle for your very mind and spirit. Headspace, powered by the Apocalypse, explores the boundaries between cinematic fiction and cinematic feelings.

Saturday, 4:00PM – 6:00PM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

[R385] “The Dark Road”

By Magpie Games
Presented by Mark Diaz Truman

The gunslinger, the priest, and the mother come to the town of Charcas, searching for signs of the El Hombre Muerto. Their journey has already carried them away from the sea of dreams to this forsaken place. What will they find here? Will they survive this town? Will they honor the Law and return to the Road?

Saturday, 7:00PM – 8:00PM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

[R417] “TimeWatch Parallel Realities”

By Pelgrane Press
Presented by Kevin W. Kulp

There are infinite realities out there, and there are corporations mining them for their resources. Instead of time traveling, you slide between parallel universes as company troubleshooters. But there are rats in the system, and it’s up to you to track them down… TimeWatch Parallel Realities is a sci-fi setting for the newly Kickstarted GUMSHOE game of time travel, investigation and chronal mayhem.

Saturday, 8:00PM – 12:00AM
Serious, 18 & Over ONLY

 

People You Should Be Paying Attention To

Today, I want to point out some people you should know if you don’t. If there’s a good response to this, I may make this a regular feature of the blog, so be sure to let me know with a comment here.

Quinn Murphy

Quinn’s the mastermind behind Thoughtcrime Games, and he’s working on something a lot of people have tried to do before: create a hip-hop RPG. It’s called Five Fires, and it’s amazing. I’ve gotten the opportunity to play it several times and it’s been a blast each time. As if that weren’t enough, he’s also an all-around nice guy and deep game thinker. If you’re into fighting games or how to put realistic cultures into your games, Quinn’s your guy.

Here’s his Patreon link.

Avery McDaldno

Avery is the talented designer responsible for MonsterHearts, The Quiet Year, and Dream Askew. Buried Without Ceremony is where they call home. Avery’s designs are amazing, and their willingness to be transparent and discuss things is commendable, especially since it is so rare. I appreciate Avery so much, even though I don’t know them that well.

Here’s their Patreon link.

 

D&D 5E PHB: Through Chapter 2

I told myself I wouldn’t purchase D&D 5E. I did. The price tag was a bit steep, and I wanted to believe I was done with D&D. It brought me into the hobby, but my interest in it had waned. But I bought the PHB anyway. What I’m about to present here are my thoughts and impressions as I read through the first part of the book. If you want more in-depth analysis, you should read Rob Donoghue’s posts over at his blog. In general, this is a good book and an easy read. I have a hard time reading through RPG books at times, but this one has been fun to read/skim.

Preface

I’ve been known to skip prefaces in books, but I’m glad I didn’t skip this one. Mike Mearls kicks things off, and I can’t imagine a better way to do it. His words are evocative, and they speak to the heart of a gamer (or at least this one). By the end of it, I thought, “Yes. THIS. This is what D&D is about.”

Introduction

The Introduction is good, covering the basics of roleplaying well. It flows well and gives information without being overwhelming. I’m happy to see percentile dice return, even though I can’t quite express why. I have no idea what they’ll be used for, but that’s okay. The inclusion of 1d2 and 1d3 is odd, and I’m not sure how I feel about them. I mean, 1d2 is a coin flip. Why not make it a coin flip? Advantage and disadvantage is amazing, and not just because I love the mechanic in 4e as part of the Avenger’s shtick. It’s intuitive, it doesn’t slow down the flow of things at the table, and it nicely solves a lot of the problems I saw with the +2 bonus from 3e days (deflection, untyped, sacred, profane, ugh). The rounding down section makes sense, until I get to the part about dividing. What in the world will we be dividing? Cover? I’ll have to wait and see, but I’m not feeling good about division. Rounding down is fine, although I seem to recall it saying earlier in the text to round up for some things, although my memory fails me on where it said that. The three pillars is a great breakdown, and I’m sure each group will have its own unique balance of them. I’m somewhat skeptical about how the rules will support each of these, but I’m hopeful.

Chapter 1: Character Creation Overview

You know some of what to expect here, especially if you’ve been looking at the previews coming out, so the best way I know to do this is a bulleted list of my impressions.

  • I know using the word race is a tradition, and species doesn’t sound like a fantasy game, but I’m onboard with the people calling for using something like kith or similar for this.
  • Charisma now intentionally does not mention physical attractiveness. YES! Thank you, Wizards of the Coast! Also, the three characteristics mentioned (confidence, eloquence, and leadership) are excellent and evocative. +1, Favorite, or whatever social media thing the kids are doing now.
  • Yay for no negative stats! Another piece of 4e brought forward. I’m a big fan.
  • Proficiency bonus appears to be a simplification to mechanics from 3e for things like attack rolls, saving throws, and the like. I approve.
  • Using an iconic character like Bruenor from Forgotten Realms as the example character is a great idea. I notice this carries through in several places with other characters, too. Good stuff.
  • Inclusion of three different ways to roll stats. Default is standard array, which has changed from before.
  • 4d6 drop lowest is second method. (Secret: I like 4d6 drop lowest).
  • Third way is point buy, with 27 points as the standard. Interesting. I’m not sure if the price-per-point has changed, but it seems like it might have. Someone else will have to weigh in.
  • The tiers of play are interesting. Four tiers with differing numbers of levels in them. Different experience point differentials between them.

Chapter 2: Races

This chapter is one page of explanation and introduction to the races, then a write-up for each race. To be fair, I skimmed some of the race entries, so what I mention here won’t be exhaustive (but that’s been true of this whole post).

The concept of a subrace returns in 5E, and I’m glad for it. It provides some interesting differentiation, although I think they missed out terribly by not making different human cultures into subraces. The mechanics would support it. A really big missed opportunity there. Also, they chose to go with naming Forgotten Realms cultures in that section. I know it’s the most popular setting, but they could have branched out and included more (since they reference other campaign settings in the other race write-ups).

Each race has a nice set of what I’ll call aspects. For example, the dwarves have Long Memory, Long Grudges. Each of these is pretty evocative (at least for the ones I read in depth), and they’re a nice way to do things. Kudos to whoever came up with that.

Another thing I wasn’t really pleased with is the inclusion of the Drow as a subrace (and including Drizz’t as the image for the Elf? Not the best option). It’s a bit of a sticking point for me, but it doesn’t make sense to include them as a subrace and say that they’re evil except for one example. Better to leave them out, although I know this would anger people too. You’re not going to be able to please both sides on them, and even though I understand they’re one of the traditional D&D races, it just felt weird to have them here.

Dragonborn return from 4E as a core race, which I’m ambivalent about, honestly. I like the nod to the Dragonlance draconians as dragonborn by another name. Very cool, that.

I understand including the Svirfneblin (Deep Gnomes) as a sidebar, but it would have been cool to see them get a full subrace section. We’ve already broken symmetry by having three elven subraces. I’d keep the broken symmetry, but take out the Drow and put in the Svirfneblin.

I love half-elves and always have. That is all.

More goodness and progressive thought from Wizards: the half-orc rape narrative is gone! YES. There’s still the evil-by-nature thing, but I can live with that.

Sigh. The tiefling. I’ll let you in on something that’s not really a secret: I’m not fond of tieflings. Don’t get me wrong; I like them okay in their 4E incarnation (which is what we’ve got here in 5E). I just miss the Planescape tiefling that had you roll a percentile die for what expression of your heritage you got. Think a random table full of tails, wings, and other infernal vestiges. There’s also the point that I love Aasimar, and I wish they got at least as much love and attention as the tiefling. I could say more, but I’d quickly get off track. Ask me on twitter or G+ if you want to know more.

So there you have it, my initial thoughts as I got through the first 2 chapters. I was initially going to include the next chapter, Classes, but I’ve already hit 1200 words.

Let me close with a few thoughts. I’ve heard others say it, but I’ll add my voice to the chorus. This feels like D&D. I like what I’m seeing; I’ll have to find an opportunity to play it, both as a player and a DM. The art is probably the most inclusive I’ve seen in D&D, with brown-skinned folks and women in reasonable armor galore. Also, different body types! Well done.

I’m sure I’ve missed some things I actually thought while reading, but this hits enough of them that you should have a good impression of my opinion. There’s a lot to like and a few things I would have done differently.

 

Icons of Planescape: The Dreamer

Planescape_Logo

Note: Planescape is the intellectual property of Wizards of the Coast and should be treated as such.

The Dreamer

Quote

“~Whispers, dreams, and prophecies.. Who can tell which is which?~” – The Dreamer

Usual Location

The Dreamer wanders wherever they will, through the places where others lose their way, but they always return to a misty fortress that drifts through the plane of Dreams.

Common Knowledge

It’s only recently that cutters have started seeing the Dreamer wandering. They’ve been seen deep in Arborea and swimming through the Elemental Plane of Water. There’s even a rumor that the Dreamer has been spotted in the Mazes.

The Dreamer helps those who have become lost, leading them safely back to more familiar territory. The price you pay for their help is a prophecy whispered to you.

Adventurers and the Icon

It’s easy to get lost on the Planes, and the Dreamer is a welcome sight in those times. Many an adventurer has a tale to tell of how they’d become lost as a Clueless and lived because of the Dreamer showing up.

Allies

The Dreamer gets along with almost everyone, although his finding and saving of the lost is irritating to many of the other Icons.

Enemies

The Dreamer hasn’t made any enemies (yet).

History

The Dreamer and their dream palace came into being after a coven of Night Hags managed to stop every mortal dreaming across the Prime Material for a period of 7 peak-to-peak cycles of Sigil. A combined army of celestials, guardinals, and eladrin managed to destroy the Night Hags and restore the ability of mortals to dream.

The Dreamer doesn’t know this history, but it’s not hard to find out what happened from any number of extraplanar sources.

The True Danger

The Dreamer seeks for someone thought forever lost. When the Dreamer finds them, no one will ever be lost again.

 

Icons of Planescape: The Lady of Pain

Planescape_Logo

Two things led to this post. The first is that I’ve been thinking about Planescape again. The second is this post from Quinn Murphy. Planescape and the Lady of Pain are the intellectual property of Wizards of the Coast and should be treated as such.

The Lady of Pain

Quote

“The Lady does not speak, but if she did, you wouldn’t much like want she’d have to say.” -rough translation from a random dabus

Usual Location

You might see the Lady of Pain anywhere in Sigil, but sightings are rare and usually short-lived. Regardless of whether she is physically present, all denizens of the Cage feel her presence regularly.

Common Knowledge

The Lady of Pain is the ruler of Sigil, twice over. She ousted Aoskar during her original rise to power, and she threw the factions out for daring to depose her. She allows no powers within Sigil, and it is said she can never leave. Her dabus go about the city, changing its configuration with a purpose known only to the Lady.

Adventurers and the Icon

Any attempt to change the status-quo in the Cage has the potential to attract the Lady’s attention. Since adventurers are prone to shake up the status-quo, encountering the Lady within Sigil is an ever-present danger. Attempting to prevent a dabus from their task and overt displays of divine might are also provocations.

Allies

The Lady of Pain has no true allies, but all the Icons have had dealings with her.

Enemies

Likewise, the Lady has many enemies, but they work in secret. Each other Icon has a reason to dislike the Lady, even the Peacemaker.

History

The truth of the Lady of Pain’s history (and her truename) is unknown by all but Aoskar, the dead god whose body floats on the Astral.

The True Danger

The Lady of Pain will recover her truename and leave the Cage. The planes of existence will be forever changed, if they survive.

Protagonists and Morality

I recently started watching House of Cards on Netflix. I’m three episodes in, and it made me think about a topic that influences what media I consume. Most of the time I don’t even realize I’m making a decision based on this preference, but it’s easy enough for me to elucidate.

I have to have someone to root for.

In most cases, the protagonist is the hero, the one we’re supposed to identify with. They’re the protag because theirs is the story we care about. For me, the protag has to function according to some kind of morality. There’s a trend in media to have every character and every decision merely reflect a “everything is shades of gray; there is no good or evil” mentality. I really don’t like this. It’s one of the reasons I’ve chosen not to watch Breaking Bad, except for the first episode, which I didn’t finish. My wife and I even stopped watching a season of Hell’s Kitchen because we just couldn’t stand any of the contestants.

Some might argue that I’m wanting things to be simple. Far from it! I like flawed characters. I can appreciate situations that are messy and don’t appear to have a good moral solution to them. I just require that there be some kind of underlying morality, even if it doesn’t match mine. Even if it doesn’t present itself as an epic good-and-evil struggle.

BeHeroesI’ve been a bit negative, so let me share something cool that does it right, in my opinion. Kingdom Come is a graphic novel from DC (I know, I know) from several years ago. In it, we find ourselves in a future where anti-heroes and vigilantes are warring in the streets without any regard for the safety of non-supers. The iconic DC heroes we know are absent, but as the story progresses, they return, led by everyone’s favorite paragon, Superman.

It’s got moral ambiguity, but it deals with good and evil, tough choices, and the nature of heroism.

Am I the only one that has trouble with this? Leave a comment and tell me about a story, a movie, a TV show, that you love that has morality and complexity.

 

 

 

On Max Temkin

Content warning: This post deals with the topic of sexual violence.

The gaming community is one that I’m usually proud to be a part of. It is a collection of amazing human beings, ones that I’m proud to know and call friends and colleagues.

But then there are other things like this: http://www.donotlink.com/ocd. The gist is that eight years ago, Max Temkin–one of the guys responsible for Cards against Humanity–sexually assaulted a woman while they were both in college. She has recently come forward. His response at the link above is an exemplar of how not to respond to something like this.

Now, normally I wouldn’t get into this kind of topic here on my blog, but I’m speaking now because this is an important issue. As a man, I feel like this is something that we’ve screwed up. As a Christian, I feel like this is something we’ve gotten wrong. I don’t have the time or the patience to get into the topic of consent here, but let me go on the record that it’s vital, it’s important, and it’s something we should be discussing. I’ve got more to say about this, but you’ll have to find me in person to discuss it further.

I know some of you may be thinking, “It’s an accusation. Shouldn’t we give benefit of the doubt? Innocent until proven guilty and all that?”

No. No, we shouldn’t. We have a woman that is standing up and saying she was raped. We should give her the benefit of the doubt. If (a big if) we’re wrong, then no lasting harm is done to this man, regardless of what the media may have led you to believe. If he did, then it’s important that we’ve shown solidarity with the victim of one of the most heinous acts we as humans are capable of.

To Max Temkin I say, “Confess and deal with the consequences of your actions.

To the woman he harmed I say, “I stand with you, although I do not know you and you don’t know me.

To our community I say, “Stop responding to these kinds of things with apathy, victim-blaming, or rationalizations. Just stop. Do the right thing.